Moonside

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Moonside wrote

I followed the creator's tumblr blog for a while back when he was a comparative nobody. I found it pretty fascinating and enjoyed his attitude, and then he pulls out a TV show out of nowhere. It's truly an internet age experience.

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Moonside wrote

I mean, let's not discount the corporate mismanagement prior to pornban, though it certainly was an unique masterstroke.

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Moonside wrote

I'm just somewhat worried I lose all my content now since its worth to the company must be about 0.000001$. I mean, on lots of blogs you can't even access tags anymore.

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Moonside wrote

It's an odd feeling this piece of writing causes me.

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Moonside wrote

This article is a bit old by now, but it's a worthy read. I think people on here know by first hand that right wing trolling was organized and coordinated even before gamergate, something much elided in discussions about the online part of the reactionary movements. And the frustration about not taken seriously about the danger of it brewing on 4chan and Reddit is all too familiar.

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Moonside wrote

I've never seen a system of pseudocode that I've liked. Basically it's too concrete for planning and too abstract to be of much help when writing code. It seems to come from an era when procedural coding was all that was agreed to matter.

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Moonside wrote

The core of it is a relatively simple story of a privileged and faulty man's rise and fall. We the audience never quite get the final view of what he was like, but that is part of the point. I read some one star reviews from common folk afterwards and based on them I'd say that if you can accept faulty protagonists who never wisen up, Citizen Kane is for you too. Give it a shot.

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Moonside wrote

I see value in this piece, but I still think it's overly negative. Nation states with almost unlimited surveillance capabilities is worrisome and do not mean to slight that, but it's operating on leaky bucket model.

A bucket leaks if it has a single small hole somewhere below the waterline. Security of computer systems is sometimes thought about along the same lines in that attackers only need to find a single vulnerability but defenders need to protect against them all. But this ignores resource constraints. Your defenses only need to be strong enough to deter potential attackers, to be too difficult to bother with, to be too costly to breach. There are targets that are "too" valuable to derive protection from this.

The bucket thinking also abstracts out the value of privacy. It's not merely hiding things-it's also about intimacy, avoiding abuses of state power and so on. That's what is lost with bucket thinking.

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Moonside wrote

TBH EVE is one of the best games I solely don't play because I don't want to spend the time on it, not because it's not to my taste. The last time I tried out the trial I had fun (soon before they went free), but playing the game the way I wanted to play it would have taken at least 10 hours a week.

Station trading was my unexpected favorite thing in EVE since you could make a bank in it, it only took a five minute to log in and do your business and it's . Then I'd also wanted to play two other characters, one space pirate menace whose exploits are financed by the trading profits and one goody two shoes to participate in player factions and such.

Also lmao The Mittani is still obnoxious and still playing. A true legend of not logging off.