Comments

1

Moonside wrote

Honestly this is a web 1.0 site that just rules. It's the dedication that takes it from being just weird into a masterpiece.

2

Moonside wrote

I agree, it's just that I am teen enough to worry about the squares not getting them! I don't think passing notes was ever 'cool' or 'hot' no more than doodling squiggles in class was and I think we might be covering some more relevant truth with this framing.

3

Moonside wrote

tbh this sounds mostly just something that teens do because they feel they have to instead of like genuinely being into g docs

2

Moonside wrote

You know, I got enough time 'under the bar', enough regrets and read too much internet writing on lifting that these kind of things just write themselves. Good luck and enjoy your mental health gains! Exercise really does help, after a while.

2

Moonside wrote

Honestly since everyone went into the advice mode, so will I:

  1. The mental health benefits of cardio are better supported than that of resistance training, but you shouldn't neglect the latter. The WHO recommendation for resistance training is twice a week for 30 minutes at a time, so that's where you could start.
  2. Be wary of dichotomies. Free weights aren't for experts and machines aren't for beginners. Compounds (multiple joint exercises) and isolations are both useful.
  3. Weight training is generally the safest recreational athletic activity. There seems to be a form of contagious worry about it though where people who don't have any expertise in it are trying very hard to warn others of its dangers. Disregard these and seek input from experts instead.
  4. People generally give very little shit about you in the gym unless you're using equipment they want to use.

If you can't get coaching and want to learn a lift, then there are a couple of strategies.

  1. First is learning easier variations first. For example to learn back squatting, you could learn goblet squats first and then progress to front squats. Goblet squats teach you good habits and it's a weaker variation in the sense that you can't use as heavy loads as with the back squats. Front squats are stronger than goblet squats, but weaker than back squats.
  2. You can get more practice in a movement if you i) do more reps per set ii) do it more often iii) you use variations instead of grinding the same exact movement. So to learn bench pressing, you could do it three times a week. On Monday do three sets of 10-20 reps of normal bench press, on Wednesday do three sets of 10-20 reps of incline bench press and no Thursday do three set of 12-20 reps of dumbbell bench press. Try to increase reps every week and if you hit 20 reps, add weight the next week. High reps are good for your joints and lessen accident potential by lowering the load and you get more opportunities for practicing the movement as well.
3

Moonside wrote

  • first name: Moon
  • last name: Moonsides
  • nick name: Dope
  • male/female: female
  • preferred class: support
2

Moonside wrote

I played something akin to a 4D space shooter once and it was bad. Also, the 5D Rubik's cube remained unsolved (but it's not like I've solved the usual one either).

2

Moonside wrote

Are you dissing those technologies? If I were less tired, I'd type something in defense of each except Jira that I've never used.

1

Moonside wrote

I am quite stunned how hubris has gotten to Facebook. It's like US foreign policy level of hubris.

2

Moonside wrote

tbh I didn't personally give the advice to make the feed chronological but rather to remove the tweets from accounts that I don't follow. If the former gets done by the tips in OP, then magnificent, but I'm not averse to it not happening if you catch my meaning.

1

Moonside wrote

Thank you, I hope these keep working after Twitter inevitably decides to disable the trick in OP.

3

Moonside wrote

Honestly just following critics you like on Twitter does most of the work as they tend to make sure to advertise their latest published pieces.

If you want to know what Tim Roger's taste is like, the Action Button best games list is probably pretty indicative. The problem with Tim's old stuff is that it's very loquacious--they are clearly hobby project writings--but they're still fun reads.

Though I'll be with Tim on this one - if you're a fan of KH, you don't need to read a review.

2

Moonside wrote

I can't remember when was the last time I read a review and came through more confused whether I'd like to buy a game than going into it. I don't have a console so the point is moot, but the review really was a trip.

4

Moonside wrote

Actually Sans is p cool, but I still love EarthBound game theory jokes about him.