twovests

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twovests wrote

I feel you, even though I never used such a phone. I'm sad the idea of a "docking station" didn't take off with these phones. Samsung has their DeX, but it's not the familiar Windows.

We do 99% of the same things we did in 2010, except more of it is on someone elses server! If software didn't keep getting worse, our phones would be powerful enough as desktop computers, let alone as thin clients! Just hook it up to a display, mouse, and keyboard!! Wah!!!

As much as I dislike it, Apple has a lot of influence and I really hope they implement a feature like that.

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twovests wrote

Oh damn that is true! I've been finding out a lot about the keyboard. It still takes a lot more time than on Android (especially with how loooooooooooong long presses take) though, so I still have plenty to complain about ;D

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twovests wrote

Tbh that's the best benefit of it! iMessage is pretty good for security (a huge step up from SMS).

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twovests wrote

iMessage itself isn't bad, but it's this rather nasty and insidious thing. People feel pressured to get iPhones for iMessage, so they can join group chats with their friends who also have it, leaving out those who don't. This is inherently tied with class, given how expensive iPhones are. I don't want to help cut these social lines just so Apple can line their pockets.

If they made it an open standard (like they said they would) then I'd be all for it.

Also my understanding is the default keyboard will keep come up for passwords and other forms. I'd rather get used to this keyboard and get fast in it than deal with an inconsistent UI.

Also maybe! I might end up selling or returning this so I'm keeping them for now just in case

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twovests wrote

another good thing: Apple sign on will offer to proxy your emails to keep your address private.

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twovests wrote

This is definitely a fair question. It's not entirely verifiable by onesself, and there's a lot weird security things to consider.

I also use 1Password. In terms of trusting someones server, that's actually a big reason they use end-to-end encryption. It means the server holds encrypted data, but not the means to un-encrypt. So, if 1Password's servers were compromised and the encrypted password vaults were downloaded, it'd still be extremely difficult and expensive to extract someones passwords from it. (They have a blogpost on this.) There'd be easier ways to get that information from someone. Relevant XKCD.

In terms of trusting code, it's rather difficult. There are open-source components that people may look at, but it's possible to sneak things in to code in a litany of ways. (Most popular: Ken Thompson's "compiler hack", 1984).

I don't know if I'm more tech savvy than you, but I can't verify any of this on my own. I do have some cryptography experience and I can vouch that 1Password's methods seem 1. Good, and 2. Rad as fuck. But my faith is in the vocal, extremely-critical, and never-satisfied tech community that is always prepared to rip to shreds any security company that fails.

Anyways, all this rambling aside, passwords are outdated but we still need them, and password managers are the only real option around the flaws of passwords. MFA / 2FA is also very very good, so even if your passwords are lost, they'll need to do more to get into your accounts. I use 2FA, so I could list my passwords here and still feel safe.

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twovests wrote

Yeah, Google is kind of like this unknowable extremely complex eldtritch being that you can't comprehend all at once, has tentacles in all manner of affairs, and is kinda fucked up.

1Password (and other managers!) has a single, solitary focus. I'd expect if it's compromised, it's less of a mistake on their end and more of a new piece of security research. (Or, on a personal level, malware.)

I think security keys are a really good thing and I hope we can all settle on USB C soon so they can be ubiquitous. Physical keys for electronic doors are really easy for almost anybody to understand, even people with no technology knowledge.

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twovests wrote

It's good!!

I might recommend doing it in two, smaller batches. I ground very fine, and lost about 1/3 the cup because the puck in my aeropress was practically solid.