musou

1

musou wrote

i'm not ready for a world where i get paid in FaceBucks

3

musou wrote

not only are u 100% correct in this assessment but i liked it so much i listened to the whole album and i love it

1

musou wrote

each individual track from the mixer at the recording studio before it all got mixed down into one song. so the guitar will be isolated from the drums and the vocals and the keyboards etc, and they'll all be separate audio files that you can use at will

2

musou wrote

it's things like this that keep me from publishing on these streaming platforms... i know i lose out on exposure (and maybe a couple pennies, cause streaming royalties are a farce unless you're carly rae jepsen) but i don't feel right about the level of control they're able to exert on the ways in which people decide what to listen to

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musou wrote (edited )

dungeon siege might have been a diablo clone but it was a pretty good diablo clone.

also age of empires was good and gave us the wololo meme.

also asheron's call was better than everquest IMO

2

musou wrote

i haven't heard this since i was a kid! so good!

3

musou wrote

i still find the cleanliness and quality of the samples on this album frankly astonishing. i have no idea how he did it. i tried replicating his results on lossless wavs with melodyne and wasn't able to get anywhere close. my current hypothesis is that either neil is a magician or he was somehow able to get access to stems

2

musou wrote

on windows i use the built in windows defender and clamav, but mostly i just try to open anything remotely sketchy on a Linux VM that isn't internet connected

4

musou wrote

i did UT2004 for about 2.5 years and i was playing 60-80 hours a week on top of going to school. i think i made about $1200 total across the whole time? i mostly got paid in CPU components. and i had to fly myself to the LANs. so really it's more like i broke even.

thresh and Fatal1ty got rich, not from playing games, but from selling the idea that you could get rich playing games. aside from that there is basically no money (in FPS anyway, which is the only area i know about). seems like that's the very definition of a bubble. eventually they'll run out of greater fools.

3

musou wrote

i wish ben shapiro would get shot in the face while attacking a rival gang's marksman on a water tower

3

musou wrote

i had a phones job in 2011 and it was a lot like this but slightly slower paced. i guess i should have expected it would be even higher pressure now.

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musou wrote

i don't have a ton of advice because ultimately i think people just have to be motivated to want to do the things you think are good. but one thing that i have seen work is to try to automate as much of this stuff as possible because then it's more likely that they'll see the benefits without having it feel like a hassle.

for example, i do most of my day job work in elixir, my team's VCS is git, and we have to use jira to track work (i hate jira but that's a whole other story). elixir has some pretty nice tooling compared to languages i've used in the past, so i have a bunch of git hook scripts that run a bunch of stuff on every commit and check for a 0 exit status, and if the script fails then git won't let you commit (unless you pass the -n flag as an escape valve but why would you do that all the time?).

so the code is automatically formatted, then typechecked, then the full set of unit tests gets run, then a static code vulnerability analyzer gets run, on every commit. and then lastly, we have a naming convention for all of our working branches to start their names with the unique designation of a task "story" (ugh) in jira. if the working branch is named according to convention, it will extract and format the jira number and prepend it to the beginning of the commit message. if the branch is named something else, you can manually prepend the number yourself, but otherwise it won't let you commit.

the final piece of the puzzle is 2 other custom scripts. the first installs the aforementioned git hooks, and the second checks to see if the hooks are installed and if not, calls the first script. the second script is configured to run before every test run. this is nice because it means a new developer basically never has to think about installing anything, all the checks just happen automatically. and if the hook scripts won't let you commit, they explain the problem in a way that is hopefully helpful and makes sense.

3

musou wrote

fortnite didn't just kill UT4 it's gonna kill the actual developers who were making UT4